What to Do with Left Over Stories

Back to thinking about stories in the agile software development sense. For the first time this iteration we have reached a situation where two stories were left incomplete at the end of the iteration. I could give a bunch of excuses about changing priorities during the iteration, but the point is that agile processes are …

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Password management finally possible

Like many others I have signed up for a lot of on-line services over the years. Keeping track of all those user ids and passwords is a big pain, especially if I find myself scratching my head to remember a user id for some service when I am at a different desk or a different …

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Is it time for Java 5?

A major goal of the Stringtree software project has always been to be as compatible as possible with all the software people are using for their Java development. Naturally that also includes whatever Java version is being used. For a long time I interpreted this goal as implying that all Stringtree code should run on …

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Small and Simple Web Applications – the Friki Way

A few years go I wrote a series of articles for The Java Ranch Journal entitled “Small and Simple Web Applications – the Friki Way”. The series showed an example of developing a very simple wiki (collaborative editable web site) in Java using Test-Driven Development (TDD) and a form of agile project management. From time …

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Don’t push requirements – pull information

It must be that end-to-end software production process is on my mind. I keep spotting interesting articles about the topic. Here’s one from Digital Dim Sum which delves into the way that requirements find their way into development, contrasting a “push” of requirements with a “pull” of information.. Don’t push requirements – pull information | …

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Business Requirements are Bullshit

A somewhat extreme rant from Steve Yegge about the inherent uselessness of “gathering business requirements” as a part of a product development process. There are some pretty obvious flaws (and many are pointed out by commenters) but it’s still an enjoying and generally on-target diatribe. Stevey’s Blog Rants: Business Requirements are Bullshit

mockito 1.5 and spying on objects

Mockito is a Java Mock objects framework which seems more usable than either of the main contenders (JMock and EasyMock). The project has just released a new version which now allows the attachment of a mock “overlay” to an existing object. This has been on my “evaluate” stack for months, but (as Harry Pynn pointed …

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Software simplicity and risk management

An interesting short article challenging the artificial division between “tactical” and “strategic” solutions, arguing that a continuum from simple solutions with less risk to more complex ones with more risk is also a valuable way of thinking through such decisions. You’d think with all my video game experience that I’d be more prepared for this: …

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Faux OOP

This is a neat little observation. Some apparently object-oriented code is actually procedural code in disguise. And some of that, is actually sequential code disguised as procedural. Jupiter Moonbeam & the Geeks from Cyberspace: Faux OOP

Fitting agile acceptance testing into the development process

It seems a comon problem. One of the first steps in implementing an agile process (such as scrum) is to put in place a fixed iteration cycle in development, but but then find difficulties fitting post-development testing (a.k.a “system testing” or “integration”) into the mix. The main problem with testing after development is that any …

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Avego’s Mobile App Spawns Hitchhiking 2.0

Hmm. One of those theoretically great but practically useless ideas. An iPhone app aimed at helping commuters and hitch-hikers pair up seems in reality to be a great way for potential thieves to be alerted to the fact that someone else is carrying a valuable iPhone. D’oh! DEMO: Avego’s Mobile App Spawns Hitchhiking 2.0 — …

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Move over T9, here comes Swype

The history of human-computer interaction is littered with alternative ways to enter and manipulate text. From one-handed keyboards through defining every letter as a different stylus swirl to predictive text on a numeric keypad. Here’s another one Swype is a way of entering a whole word with a wiggle of a finger or stylus on …

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The App Store’s Exclusionary Policies

Dreaming of making your fortune selling your great idea for a software app to millions of iPhone users? Perhaps you should read this before you start work. Apparently Apple have a habit of refusing to sell competing applications through their store. Unfortunately their idea of what that may encompass is vague and seemingly broad. Together …

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Killer Interviewing Tips for Podcasters, Part 1

I still have plans to try and record some audio interviews to present as podcasts on this blog. back in 2006 when O’Reilly released “Podcasting Hacks” they also posted a few articles on the subject to support the book. This one is a little superficial, but still seems useful. O’Reilly — Killer Interviewing Tips for …

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Planning using post-its and spreadsheets

A short article about planning and organising a project using post-its and/or a spreadsheet to associate tasks with phases. The interesting thing about this article for me is the explicit mention that the process is cyclic and iterative, rather than linear. Tasks are expected to move around the phases in a variety of directions, and …

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